List

Analog

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A watch that shows the time by means of a numbered dial and hands.

Analog/Digital

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A watch that shows the time by both analog and digital, where each time is displayed separately.

Atomic Clock

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Currently the most accurate timekeeping devices on earth, accurate to 1 second in 1,400,000 years. This information is broadcast throughout the day from a radio transmitter in Ft. Collins, Colorado.

Automatic Movement

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Type of movement in which the mainspring is wound automatically as a result of natural motion of the wearer's arm, to provide energy to run the watch and making manual winding unnecessary.

Band

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The metal strap that goes around the wearers wrist. A watch band is typically made up of flexible, separate links, where many can be removed (or added) to accommodate the wearer's wrist size. some band materials consist of stainless steel, gold plated, or black ion finish over metal

Bezel

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Refers to the outer ring that holds the crystal in place and helps protect the watch dial. Bezels can be fixed or rotating, and can have stones or various markings. Rotating bezels can be turned for use in various timekeeping activities.

Cabochon Crown

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Type of gemstone that is fitted on the crown of the watch. The cabochon is shaped and polished, as opposed to being faceted, and is decorative in purpose.

Caliber

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Refers to the type of movement, and its specific functions, used in a watch. The first four digits of the case number identifies the caliber number.

Case

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Houses the internal watch components, such as the movement, dial, and hands.

Case Number

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Eight digit number (normally alpha and numeric) that appears on the caseback. This number is used to identify the watch model number.

Caseback

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Underside of the case that functions to help seal the watch and provide protection to the movement. Caseback types can be either snap on or screw on. Various markings can be found on the caseback, including the case number, serial number, water resistance level, country of origin, and manufacturer.

Circuit Block

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The circuit block controls the voltage and works as an amplifier and power regulator of the quartz movement.

Clasp

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Part of the watch band. The clasp keeps the band securely attached to the wrist and, by unfolding it, allows the wearer to easily remove the watch. The clasp often has minor adjustments to allow for a more comfortable fit.

Coil Block

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The coil block acts as a conductor where the electric current flows between components of the quartz movement.

Crown

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The button that is used to set the day, date, and time of the watch. It is normally located at the 3 o'clock position. Crowns on highly water resistant watches screw down to help ensure moisture does not enter the case. The crown is attached to the winding stem.

Crystal

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The clear glass or plastic that covers and protects the dial. Crystals are either acrylic, mineral, or sapphire (which is the most scratch resistant).

Depth Alarm

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Divers wear depth alarm watches that sound when the wearer exceeds a preset depth level. In most watches, the alarm stops sounding when the diver ascends above the preset level.

Dial

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The dial, also known as the "face," gives the watch much of its character based on the materials, markers, colors, and textures used in its design. In conjunction with the hands, the dial displays the time.

Digital

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Watch that shows the time through digits, as opposed to a dial and hands (analog).

Flight Computer

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Seiko watches that are fitted with a rotary slide rule bezel for rapid calculations and conversions of flight data as required by pilots. The rotary slide rule consists of a bezel ruler and a dial ruler.

Gasket

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Gaskets function to seal the case back, crystal, and crown to protect against water infiltration during normal wear. Gaskets are normally made of rubber, with some made of plastic. Gaskets should be replaced every few years to ensure the watch maintains it's water resistance capability.

GMT Time Zone

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Greenwich Mean Time (GMT), also known as Zulu time, is set to the International clock in Greenwich, England. It reflects the world time on a 24 hours scale and is used by pilots around the globe.

Gold plated

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A layer of gold electroplated to a base metal. The thickness of the plating is measured in microns.

GPS Solar

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Accurate time, anywhere on earth. Seiko has created a watch that automatically receives time, time zone, and day and date data from the global network of GPS satellites. It recognizes all the 39 time zones on earth.

Horology

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The science of time measurement, which encompasses the craft of designing and constructing watches.

Jewel

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Synthetic sapphire or ruby used in a mechanical watch used to reduce gear friction. They are hard and wear very slow, and therefore long lasting.

Kinetic Direct Drive

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Kinetic Direct Drive, caliber 5D44, encompasses the best of both worlds; quartz accuracy with the emotional engagement of a mechanical watch and is environmentally friendly. This exclusive technology draws energy from the movement of your wrist or the turn of the crown and keeps you informed with a power reserve indicator.

Kinetic Perpetual

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Another world's first technology from Seiko. Kinetic Perpetual combines the features and benefits of the industry's leading watch technology - Kinetic Auto Relay and Perpetual Calendar. Once set, the calendar automatically adjusts for odd and even months, including February of leap years up to February 2100. When the watch senses 24 hours of inactivity it puts itself into "sleep mode" to conserve energy. The date continues to advance correctly while the watch sleeps. Wake it up with a few shakes of your wrist and it automatically resets itself to the correct time even if it's been asleep for up to 4 years.

Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)

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Liquid crystal display (LCD) watches show a numeric display continuously by means of the liquid held in a thin layer between two transparent plates.

Lugs

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The attaching points that hold the strap or band to the case.

Main Plate

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The base plate upon which all other parts of a watch movement are mounted.

Mainspring

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The spiral torsion spring of metal ribbon that is the power source in mechanical watches. As the mainspring unwinds power is provided to the wheels of the movement.

Markers

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Applied to the dial and separated by equal distance to read the time.

Moonphase

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A window in a watch which indicates the phases of the moon through 29 1/2 days.

Mother-of-Pearl

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The iridescent interior of a freshwater mollusk that is often used to decorate watch dials. Its colors include milky white, blue and pink. Mother of Pearl is available in an array of colors, such as blue, pink, yellow and more.

Movement

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Internal mechanism of a watch or clock, which is enclosed inside the case.

Movement Repair (Move. Rpr)

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Refers to the service that will be performed on the internal movement of the watch or clock. The service includes movement disassembly, repair/replacement of any broken movement parts, cleaning, lubrication, and timing adjustment to manufacturer specifications. All case gaskets will also be replaced.

Perpetual Calendar

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Type of movement that automatically adjusts for odd and even months, including February of leap years.

Perpetual Solar Alarm Chronograph

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Seiko Perpetual Alarm Chronograph is powered by any light source and the perpetual calendar automatically adjusts for odd and even months, including February of leap years and also offers the features of a chronograph along with a 12 hour alarm.

Push Button

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Push buttons are located on either side of the watch case. Push buttons are used to activate (and stop) certain functions of the watch, such as the stopwatch feature on a chronograph watch.

Quartz Movement

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Type of movement that is normally powered by a battery. Through rapid and consistent oscillations, the quartz crystals provide a consistent method of measuring time over a wide range of environmental conditions.

Radio Sync Solar (caliber 8B)

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Powered by light energy and radio wave controlled, the Radio Sync Solar caliber receives radio signals from the Cesium clock in Colorado to precisely adjust the time and calendar. Caliber 8B92 has a world time function of 25 time zones.

Rechargeable ion cell

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Takes the place of a conventional watch battery in a solar watch. The energy that is collected from a light source and converted into electrical energy is stored in the rechargeable ion cell.

Seiko Kinetic

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The first and only quartz watch powered by human energy. Based on revolutionary technology, Seiko Kinetic watches run entirely on self-generated energy from the natural movement of your writs. Environmentally friendly. The most advanced electronic watch technology. Six month power reserve.

Solar Alarm Chronograph

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Provides the standard watch functions of a chronograph as well as precise stopwatch timing for a variety of activities; it is powered by all types of light and never needs a battery change.

Solar cell

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Used in Solar watches, light energy is received by the solar cell and converted into electrical energy to power the watch.

Spring Drive

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While Spring Drive is like a mechanical watch in using a mainspring as the power source, it uses the Tri-synchro Regulator to control the quartz crystal to provide superior accuracy. Spring Drive is accurate to +/- 1 second per day, the world's most accurate watch powered by a mainspring.

Stainless Steel

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A durable metal alloy that is almost rust resistant and rarely corrodes or discolors. Highly used in many bands and cases.

Stem

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Thin metal "pipe" that connects the crown to the movement.

Strap

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Made up of either synthetic or natural material, the strap attaches to the case and goes around the wearer's wrist. Common materials include leather, rubber, and urethane.

Tachymeter

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Scale normally engraved on the bezel used to compute speed based on travel time, or to measure distance based on speed. The spacing of the marks are not linear, but rather logarithmic.

Tri-synchro Regulator

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Regulating system unique to Spring Drive movements, the Tri-synchro Regulator controls and releases the mechanical, electrical, and electro-magnetic energy generated by the mainspring. It replaces the escapement used in mechanical movements and is more stable and precise.

Water Resistance

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Describes the level of protection a watch has from water damage. Water resistant to: 30 meters - ok for splashes of water or rain, but not of swimming or diving. 50 meters - ok for showering or swimming in shallow water. 100 meters - ok for swimming and snorkeling. 200 meters - ok for skin diving. Diver's 200 meters - meets ISO standards and is ok for scuba diving.